Continuation-Jose.png

 


José (seated) looks on as an interesting story is told by Jackie Paris...

 

  

Daily Emails about Music and Jazz
(continued)

  

* * *

Hi BJ,

You're really amazing! When you decide to do something you do it immediately! So, the CD is on the way - wow! Yes, José is Spanish, but Raffaelli is unmistakable Italian. Italian equivalent of José is Giuseppe (like Giuseppe Verdi, the noted classical composer). You're right, Conte is the younger brother of Pete Candoli. By the way, I remember many years ago Pete married a movie or TV actress. Do you remember her name?

I'd met Joe Pass several times in Brazil. Matter of fact, we exchanged letters from 1978 until his last days. Joe was a fantastic guy, always smiling and full of life. He gave his personalized guitar to Chico Curzio, a friend of mine, who also was one of his many Brazilian friends.

Frank Rosolino played in Brazil in September 1978, a month and half before he commited suicide. It was tragic in many ways and surprised everyone who met him here because he seemed to be a quiet man without any trace of madness.

Portuguese and Spanish have some similarities but also so many differences. I know that Portuguese is a very strange and difficult language to learn. Many foreigners can't understand the peculiarities of the language and the accent is always difficult to assimilate.

Of course, it is so difficult to speak English. It is not easy to pronounce several words properly. In my own case, I don't speak it fluently. I have to think before I say some words and a conversation with me must be boring for Americans. Last week I met here Rick Warm, the owner of Malandro Records, from Cincinnati, Ohio. Rick's catalogue is specialized in Brazilian music. The covers of his CDs are reproductions of old Rio pictures, mostly taken around 1940 in the famous Copacabana Beach. Fortunately, Rick speaks Portuguese, for he lived in São Paulo for 4 or 5 years. But that night he came with an American couple and I had to speak English. I've tried my best, but I know my flawness on the language. Anyway, he had some conversation.

So you descend from German and British relatives. Not bad...

Sometimes I wonder if I was born in the USA, how different could be my entire life. Certainly it would be much better, I believe.

Later,

José

* * *

Hi BJ,

Hope you had a nice weekend. I'm returning this morning and found your emails which I'll answer one by one, according my work permits.

Joe Carter told me about a post where someone insisted Walter Wanderley and Wanderley were the same person. [. . .]

He also runs the Empathy label with a catalog around 10 or 12 records, including his two CDs playing Brazilian music; one of them is "Um Abraço no Rio", recorded here in Rio de Janeiro with local musicians and, incidentally, I wrote the liner notes. The second, also playing Brazilian songs, was recorded in New York with Nilson Matta (bass) and Portinho (drums) two Brazilians living up there for a long time.

Later,

José

* * *

Hi again,

There is no reason for you to be intimidated to tell your opinions. You're a highly well informed person about Brazilian and other kinds of music. Please, go ahead and tell whatever you think and you want. .

I know about the competition in the USA. There are so many great writers and journalists who know so much about jazz and music up there. Here in Brazil we have a strong competition but few people know about jazz, despite [that] so many write about it. As you would expect, most of them write many mistakes that sometimes are very funny.

To tell the truth, I pay attention to every American or European who writes about jazz and/or Brazilian music in Internet because there are always many things I can learn and to exchange ideas. On the other hand, only occasionally I receive emails from my readers because jazz does not have many followers and fans down here. I can tell that 99.9% of Brazilians enjoy pop music, but so few have any interest in jazz.

Your friend,

José


 

 


 

Kai Winding, "More Brass", Verve #V6-8657 (1966).[LP]
Produced by Creed Taylor.


 

Hi once again,

You know a lot about trombone playing and technique ---- a real lesson to everyone. A coincidence: yesterday I heard the Charles Mingus Debut CD-Box and one of the sessions from 1953 reunited four trombonists (J.J. Johnson, Bennie Green, Kai Winding and Willie Dennis) with John Lewis (piano), Mingus (bass) and Art Taylor (drums). I heard a lot of Jay and Kai albums and one of my favorites is their Prestige session from 1954 with Dick Katz (piano), Paul Chambers (bass) and Al Harewood (drums); the record has some stunning compositions and arrangements, apart [from] excellent solos by both trombonists.

Speaking about Winding, do you know one of his Verve albums titled "Surf Ride"? By the way, I never heard "More Brass".

Your friend,

José

* * *

Hello BJ,

Good morning. Good news, as always.

Yes, the Rainbow Room is still there, at least until last November, last time I went to New York. In 1982 I went up there to the Rainbow Room to hear the Sy Oliver Orchestra. Sy Oliver was one of my favorite composers/arrangers from the Swing Era since his Jimmy Lunceford days and later, from 1939 to 1946, when he was an exclusive composer/arranger for the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra. Oliver composed some well known jazz originals, been "Opus Number One" the most famous, played until today by many big bands. Sy was leading a dance orchestra and in the intermission I invited him to came to our table (I was with my late wife). He was a perfect gentleman, a very kind man. He was 72 at that time (my age today!) and we had some 10/15 minute conversation. He was surprised because he couldn't imagine someone in Brazil would know him... When I said I was Brazilian, he surprised me telling in the late twenties/early thirties he had a friend from Brazil, a pianist named Fernando Pessoa Cavalcante. By a big coincidence, Fernando was the father of one of my dearest friends and I told him. He asked about Fernando, who had passed away many years before, and also asked what Fernando's son was doing in Brazil. Before Sy Oliver returned to the stage for the second part of the show, he asked me a favour:

Sy Oliver: Could you do me a favor when you'll be back to Brazil ?

José: Certainly, with great pleasure.

Sy Oliver: Although I don't know him, give my regards to Fernando's son. But, please remember my name is Sy Oliver.

What a modest person! Never see someone like him! How could I forget the name of a musician whom I admired so much?

Certainly I remember the big hit "More", recorded by Kai Winding.

Your friend,

José

* * *

Hi BJ,

Good morning!

Donato opens tomorrow a new night club in Rio with his trio. Today I'm gonna make an interview with him to be published tomorrow. The new club is Mika's Piano Bar and it is located in the Ipanema district (the same of the famous girl). He rejuvenated his enthusiasm this year because he is in love with a woman of Brasilia. After the heart attack he suffered a few months ago his career improved very much playing in several Brazil's cities. I never heard "A Bad Donato". I suppose its title comes from the well known jazz musicians' slang referring as "Bad" to anyone they think is a great player. Despite [that] I'd never heard [it], if my memory is correct I believe the arrangements in this album are by Eumir Deodato, another Brazilian living in the USA.

Let me say that Donato is a great talker, he has thousands [of] stories to tell about music, musicians and especially the 14 years he spent up there in California. He is a fountain of musical information, his experiences are so rich and he speaks fluently hours and hours about all those subjects without any interval. It is so easy to make him talk. You say a word and immediately he begins to discuss about it in a long, absorbing and fascinating way. He could speak for days and weeks if you don't stop him.

This man could be a great writer, or at least he could dictate his experiences and thoughts to someone to transcribe it in a marvelous book. It is incredible none of our intelligent and very smart book editors never thought about him. Certainly the book never would be a bestseller, but all the musical community would buy it.

Later,

José

 

* * *

Hi BJ,

In my humble opinion, singer-pianist-composer Johnny Alf is the spiritual father of bossa nova, he influenced Antonio Carlos Jobim with his compositions full of advanced harmonies, jazz related chords and heavely influenced by American composers. Generally speaking, João Gilberto is considered the father of bossa nova but I hesitate to tell João Donato is the mother. I believe it is quite incorrect because Donato never was a real bossa nova player. He was heavely influenced by American jazz, especially Stan Kenton and Shorty Rogers, and later by Latin rhythms when he played with Mongo Santamaria. When bossa nova flourished he was away living in California and returned only 14 years later. His bossa nova relation was only peripheral, so to speak. Sure he played with João Gilberto, Tião Neto and Milton Banana, all bossa nova musicians, but this happened during a short time of his career touring in Italy. In one sentence, I consider Donato an original musician, simply Donato is Donato. Donato himself claims he isn't a bossa nova musician. But all this is a subject for long discussions.

After I talk to Donato and write the piece, I'll advise you.

Later,

José


 

 


Enrico Simonetti, "Samba Big Band", (Label unknown), #346.6030 (196_).[LP]

[Album photo courtesy of Claudio Simonetti]


 

Hi BJ,

Enrico Simonetti lived in São Paulo in the fifties and sixties. He returned to Italy later, but I don't remember when. He was a highly talented arranger and during all that time he led a big band and worked for a local TV. Of course, he recorded many albums, arranged for singers and commercial recordings. I never met Enrico but I admired his expertise. Unfortunately I don't have any of his records, so I can't name them to you. I'm gonna check that and let's see what I'll get.

Your friend,

José

* * *

(after telling Jose that I found a large piece he had written in two places on the internet about Duke Ellington's career, he replied with this:)

 

Hi BJ,

Which Ellington piece did you read? Where you find it? I'm curious. Sure I love Ellington and his music. I believe no one equaled his highest standard in American music. At least, IMHO nobody equaled although American music gave several geniuses to jazz and popular music. But I wonder where you read that piece.

José

* * *

HI BJ,

I don't have anything to do with that "Jazz Club" site. It is robbery! I'm gonna check that and let's see what I can do against those pirates.

Thank you,

José

* * *

(Regarding doing two interviews for my upcoming new sites on Tom Jobim and João Donato)

Hi BJ,

Certainly I will be extremely pleased to do what you want, so send the questions. I appreciate all your efforts for the music. You're a real dedicated person always ready to serve the good music the best way you can. You must be rewarded by the Brazilian Minister of Culture for what you do. Few Brazilians do so much as you do, believe me.

Well, I'm at your disposal for the questions or anything more.

Your friend,

José

 

(The interview answers on João Donato & Tom Jobim that JDR sent me a few days later are featured on my "Remembering Antonio Carlos Jobim" site and my "Discovering Joao Donato" site.)



 


Tex Beneke, "Tex Beneke and His Orchestra 1949", Golden Era Records, #LP-15050 (1949).[LP]

[Album photos courtesy of José Sanches Perez]


Hi BJ,

I just arrived to work and found your messages. Besides your message from yesterday informing Tex Beneke's passing, today I've found another from a friend telling Tito Puente passed away. It means more work to me because usually I write the obituaries about musicians [that are] directly or indirectly related to jazz, as are the cases of Beneke and Puente. Matter of fact I had a lot of work in the last days and the hours of the day aren't enough for the amount of work. But this is often common to those who work at a newspaper. Everyday we have surprises, no one knows what one will do when they leave home in the morning. [. . .]

I'm eager to take a look at Claudio Slon's site, it must be very, very interesting. As I know how careful and precise you are concerning this kind of work (and precise and careful in other areas too!), I can imagine how wonderful it has to be. I suppose Claudio gave you every [piece of] information about his career and his long tenure with pianist Dick Farney, one of the most important jazz musicians of Brazil.

Your friend,

José

* * *

Hi BJ,

In a few minutes I'm leaving to [go to] São Paulo to see and write reviews of the Chivas Jazz Festival (Regina Carter, Steve Lacy, David Murray, Mal Waldron, Charlie Hunter, Geri Allen and many more), so I'm in a rush.

Don't apologize for your emails. I have to make it due [to] my lack of answers, to be sure, but remember that sometimes my spare time here is almost none.

[. . .]

Have a nice weekend and until Monday when I'll return from São Paulo.

Your friend,

José

* * *

Hi BJ,

[. . .] Well, I'm in a rush here - there is a lot of work to do. Tomorrow begins a new jazz festival in São Paulo. I did an interview with T. S. Monk, Thelonious Monk's son, who is bringing a sextet to Brazil. Singer Nnennah Freelon also is coming. Both are scheduled for concerts in a Rio night club. Let's see.

José

 

* * *

BJ,

Many years ago this Kai Winding LP ("Soul Surfin'") was released in Brazil. If my memory is correct, the cover had a girl surfing, isn't?  Well, according to Johnny Alf, one of Kai's compositions was object of plagiarism by a Brazilian composer and it resulted in the song "Little Boat"(Barquinho), until today a bossa nova standard. If you know Barquinho could you detect which Kai composition originated this song ? I'm very interested to know about it.

I never met Creed Taylor but I think he did a great disservice to jazz when he had his CTI label. At that time he recorded many excellent jazzmen in very commercial albums. Of course, there is no sin in making money honestly with commercial music, but it was sad hearing musicians like Freddie Hubbard, Ron Carter, George Benson (before he started singing), Milt Jackson, Grover Washington Jr., Hank Crawford, Hubert Laws playing such commercial and innocuous music. Freddie Hubbard told me in an interview that he got a lot of money with his CTI records, but he preferred to forget them.

Later,

José

(To which I replied:)

 

>Many years ago this Kai Winding LP was released in Brazil. If my memory is correct, the cover had a girl surfing, isn't?

José: I can't say as I have never seen the cover of this album, so I don't know it's picture. In fact, I had not heard of this LP title until you mentioned it to me a few weeks ago. It is one Kai Winding album I do not own, myself.

>Well, according to Johnny Alf, one of Kai's compositions was object of plagiarism by a Brazilian composer and it resulted in the song "Little Boat"(Barquinho), until
>today a bossa nova standard. If you know Barquinho could you detect with Kai compositon originated this song?

I know that Brazilian song very well (I have at least two WW arrangements of it), but not having Kai's Soul Surfin' album, I cannot compare any of the songs on there to it.

>I never met Creed Taylor but I think he did a great disservice to jazz when he had his CTI label. At that time he recorded many excellent jazzmen in very commercial
>albums. Of course, there is no sin in making money honestly with commercial music, but it was sad hearing musicians like Freddie Hubbard, Ron Carter, George
>Benson (before he started singing), Milt Jackson, Grover Washington Jr., Hank Crawford, Hubert Laws playing such commercial and innocuous music.  Freddie
>Hubbard told me in an interview that he got a lot of money with his CTI records, but he preferred to forget them.

Many people feel about Creed Taylor the same way you do, even here in the U.S. I have mixed feelings where he is concerned. I believe that he was an excellent producer while he was still with Verve, and some of the best albums I have are those on that label with him producing. When he went to A&M/CTI, things did change a lot, I agree, but the one thing those albums did do in a positive manner was introduce the general public in the U.S. to jazz by his recording all those big names (many of which he brought with him when he left Verve). I can tell you for certain that a lot of the record-buying public who would normally not buy jazz albums at all--bought those A&M/CTI ones. Even if they were not the best examples of jazz as you say, those albums served as an introduction to jazz for many people--who then went and sought out (and bought) other non-CTI jazz albums that those artists made. I know this to be the case because I have read people's messages on internet forums who have said that this was their experience. Believe it or not, even those wonderful album cover photos by Pete Turner on the A&M/CTI label (especially on the early 3000 series), attracted people to buy the records. As long as it got the public to seek out other jazz recordings by these same artists, I think the CTI albums served a purpose.

Also, to give some credit where credit is due, Creed Taylor also produced Jobim's "Wave", "Tide", and "Stone Flower" albums (all of which were under the CTI label except for "Stone Flower", which was Epic/CBS), and most people like all three of those albums and consider them to be Jobim classics.

I can tell you from my own experience, that I get criticized no end by Brazilians for liking the U.S. WW albums for much the same reason. They constantly tell me that the WW U.S. albums are not authentic Brazilian music, that some of them were too commercial, that WW's style of playing changed dramatically in them from how he played in Brazil, etc. That may all be true and I don't even disagree with those reasons. But the fact of the matter is that his U.S. albums served as my introduction (when I was twelve years old) to both him and Brazilian music, and without that introduction--I would have not on my own sought out his Brazilian recordings--which I now also love just as much as those U.S. albums I first listened to in 1966. Brazilian LP imports were impossible to get in the U.S. in the late 1960s, so I would have not even had the access to obtaining them back then--even if I knew about them at that time.

--bj


 

 

 

Antonio Carlos Jobim, "Wave", A&M/CTi, #SP-3002 (1967).[LP]
Antonio Carlos Jobim, "Tide", A&M/Polydor [Japan] #POCM-5053 (1998).[CD]

 

 

Antonio Carlos Jobim, "Stone Flower", EPIC #ZK 45480 (1990).[CD]
All three albums produced by Creed Taylor.


 

BJ,

You're right once again. Really Creed Taylor's productions for CTi label at least served as an introduction to jazz for many youngsters, although they scarcely offered jazz music. I know he also produced some very good jazz albums for Impulse, including the great Quincy Jones' "This Is How I Feel About Jazz", certainly one of the best jazz records produced in the fifties. This particular record is one of my long standing favorites and still today I keep listening [to] it from time to time. The solos of Art Farmer, Lucky Thompson, Jimmy Cleveland, Phil Woods and Herbie Mann are beautiful statements, some of them are real gems. Also Quincy harmonized Clifford Brown original 1953 solo of "Stockholm Sweetnin" (a great tune) for the entire band. I memorized this solo since 1957, when I bought the record, and still today I can sing it from the first to the last note. By a coincidence, last night I heard the Clifford Brown "Memorial Album", recorded in 1953, with that original solo. Brownie, as he was affectionally called, was a genius. He is one of my very great favorites. In my humble opinion, Brown is one of the greatest ever jazz trumpeters. My eyes remain full of tears when I remember his tragic death at 26, in 1956.

Your friend,

José



 


Kai Winding and J.J. Johnson, "The Great Kai and J.J.", Impulse! #11105-0225-2 (199_).[CD]

Kai Winding, "The Incredible Kai Winding Trombones", Impulse! [Japan] #MVCJ-19089 (1998).[CD]

Both albums produced by Creed Taylor.


Hi José: Unfortunately, I am not familiar with any of these albums you mention here and recognize only a few of the artists that you name. I don't know Clifford Brown at all or his work. If you like him that much, he must be a great player. I have enjoyed Quincy Jones' work over the years (he was a close friend to Henry Mancini as well), but I don't know the particular album of Quincy's that you mention. I do own a couple of the albums on the old Impulse label, though, and they are both trombone albums. One is "The Incredible Kai Winding Trombones" and the other is called "The Great Kai and J.J., Swinging Together Again". One is from the late 1950s and the other is from the very early 1960s and at least one of those albums was produced by Creed Taylor (maybe both were, but I'd have to check the album cover of the other one to make sure).

I know Herbie Mann mostly from the Bossa Nova work he did (and still continues to do, by the way). Claudio Slon toured with him in Germany last year, and Claudio said that most of Herbie's concert material is still Brazilian music. You will hear Claudio mention this in the interview CDs I sent you where he talks about working with Herbie Mann.

I do know what you mean about being so familiar with improv solos that you have them memorized; I have some memorized myself that I really love.

 

--bj  



 


Henry Mancini, "Days of Wine and Roses", RCA/BMG #07863 66603-2 (1995).[3 CD boxed set compilation with booklet]
Boxed set produced by Paul Williams.

Walter Wanderley, "Kee-Ka-Roo", Verve #V6-8739 (1967).[LP]
Produced by Creed Taylor.


BJ,

Wonderful, wonderful. Yesterday I received the big package with 6 CDs. Great!  Thanks a million!  I don't have enough words to express my gratitude. As you might expect, I didn't have enough time in just one night to hear everything, but I've heard a little bit of each, including the first part of [the] Claudio Slon interview. [. . .]

Thanks also for the CD surprise (Astrud Gilberto/Walter Wanderley). Looking [at] the cover I remembered this record was released in LP form long time back, but I never had it. Funny, the song Tristeza was composed for the carnival of 1965 or 1966 but it survived for a long time (Oscar Peterson recorded it many years ago for the German label MPS).

Mancini Também É Samba --- Frankly, after all those years I forgot completely how its music sounded. I was deeply moved hearing it again as it was the first time. Matter of fact, this was the only CD I've heard from the first to the last track. One thing I forgot about it: guitarist Waltel Branco also wrote some arrangements and played [a] few bars in one track. João Meirelles called me to make an appointment for next Thursday. As I told you, he don't know what he will hear in my home and surely he will be completely surprised with your gift to him.

Mr. Lucky Goes Latin ---- I heard some tracks and the music is exceptional.  Mancini could do no wrong. I have his 3-CD box "Days of Wine and Roses" (do you know this?) and I'm in doubt if some tracks are on the box. I hadn't time to compare. In a first look to the titles of the box it seems none of this "Goes Latin" are on it.

Claudio Slon interviews ---- I heard the first part, it is very interesting and informative. Claudio speaks English fluently and everything he said is instructive. The girl Cenir has a heavy accent, as you remarked, but I must confess my accent is heavier than hers.

Well, I can only add A BIG THANK YOU again.

José.


 

 


Henry Mancini, "Mr. Lucky Goes Latin", RCA #LSP-2360 (1961).
Produced by Dick Pierce.


Hi again,

Sure must be João Gilberto in the WW/Astrud record. At that time, João was married to Astrud and living in New York. Yes, Tristeza was a huge carnival success; its composers Niltinho and Haroldo Lobo belonged to one of the Rio samba schools. By the way, in the Oscar Peterson LP there is an error:  instead of Haroldo Lobo has been credited Edu Lobo as Tristeza's composer.

Tonight I'm gonna hear A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness album. You know everything, indeed, even the wrong information about the drums/percussion in the Wave album! You're a Brazilian honorary citizen !

Thanks,

José




 


Astrud Gilberto and The Walter Wanderley Trio, "A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness", Verve #V6-8673 (1966).[LP]
Produced by Creed Taylor.


 

 

Hi BJ,

Everything is all right?  Last Friday was my day off, so only today I'm returning. I'm [in] a rush today with a lot of work, so this message is to say that I'm alive and well and to answer these questions.

Yes, I've heard and enjoyed A Certain Smile, A Certain Sadness the most. WW was a genius of the organ, he had his own style on the instrument.  I admire specially his light touch and great taste in some songs, a master of dynamics who knew how to get a proper balance for every nuance and every inflection of his execution. This was a natural gift he had since the beginning that mellowed along the time, when the experience he got helped to develop furthermore all these musical components of his fertile mind. Of course, Claudio Slon is an indispensable asset for the music, with big ears listening all the time, sometimes more felt than heard, but always there, alert, insinuating and even anticipating some [of] WW's ideas. To tell the truth, Astrud Gilberto never was one of my favorite singers, but in this record she does a nice job, maybe under the guidance of WW and/or João Gilberto. To resume things, I've heard the CD twice in a rush, I mean, without interruption. Thanks for your beautiful gift.

Another thing: João Meirelles failed to appear and didn't say anything. I'm gonna call him tonight. The Jack Wilson playing Mancini [album] must be great. When I started to listen a phone call distracted my attention and when I hung up it was time to leave home, so I'm gonna hear it very soon, maybe tonight.

Finally, a friend of mine called me just a few minutes ago telling [me that] João Donato moved to Brasília. He is in love with a woman there and love spoken higher, so he moved.

Your friend,

José

P.S. - as my work today is a real mountain, tomorrow I'll answer your other emails.  Sorry.

José


Hi BJ,

It is incredible, but until today I couldn't access your website, mine and any other site. I asked help in the newspaper department and they are checking to know what is really happening. Many of my colleagues have the same problem. It distress[es] me because I wanna read all new things you put in my website including Chico Curzio interview and many other very interesting things in your site, Mancini's and Claudio Slon's. Too bad I'm missing so many important informations and news. May be tomorrow, who knows?

Let me say something: I was in New York last year in May and went to the Knickerboker to hear some music with my dear friend Frank Tafuri. In a table next of ours was seated Henry Mancini's widow, recognized by Frank. Apparently. She was hearing the music with great interest, looking [at] the musicians all the time, despite she was in the company of three people. Even at that late age she looked so beautiful; her hair was white like snow. I believe she is around 70, but [she] carries her years very well.

José


HI BJ,

Unfortunately last night I haven't time to hear the Jack Wilson CD. Yesterday I was contacted by a musician who wants me [to] write a booklet for his 7-Box CD to be released in October and our conversation about the subject lasted more than 3 hours. This work will take some of my spare time - I'll do it outside my work hours in the newspaper, of course. Anyway, I'm eager to hear it and tell you later.

José


(After sending José The New York Times' review of the João Gilberto concert at Carnegie Hall in June, 2000, he had this to say:)

 

Hi again,

This review explain so many things. What's incredible is that many people still trust in João Gilberto. He did such things so many times that his presence always means problems. He is the king of complication.

Thanks again,

José


Hi once again,

It is funny this guy has heard about Beco das Garrafas, our equivalent of the 52nd street in NY. Last Sunday afternoon after leaving a restaurant in Copacabana (Rio most celebrated district - with a beautiful beach) I crossed the street near the Beco da Garraffas, where bossa nova bloomed and I didn't resist to go there. I stayed a few minutes watching this small block and the doors of its long defunct four small night clubs remembering how many nights I spent there in the late fifities-early sixties hearing and meeting the bunch of many great musicians and friends.

For a moment I returned to that beautiful and unforgettable past, a glorious past when Rio was a peaceful city where we could walk at any hour of the day, night or dawn without assaults, robberies and murders like today we face in the streets. Standing in the corner I was thinking about that wonderful time and I wished I could go back 40 years to the past just to enjoy the atmosphere of the local, my friends (some of them already gone, unfortunately), the girls I've met and eventually some of them became my girlfriends. Believe me, at that time I was a good looking man and many girls approached me and eventually they fell in love with me. After revisiting all those memories, suddenly my mind rang a bell in my head remembering we are in 2000 and that good times will never return. When I recovered from my thoughts I noticed my eyes were full of tears.

Excuse all these reminiscences and forgive this old man.  After all I'm just a romantic and sentimental old man.

José




 


Herbie Mann, "Do the Bossa Nova with Herbie Mann/My Kinda Groove" Collectibles, #6245 (1999).[2 CD Compilation]


Hi BJ,

Despite the lot of work, I'm gonna try to answer all your emails. If you aren't familiar with Quincy Jones "How I Feel About Jazz", on the other side I'm unfamiliar with these Kai Winding albums. I have just one CD of the Jay and Kai quintet.[. . .]

Herbie Mann was an advocate of Brazilian music since its first hour. He heard bossa nova (as all musicians who came with him in a package called American Jazz Festival) the first time he came here in 1961 and was totally taken by the music. One year later he returned to record the "Do The Bossa Nova" album with local musicians, Antonio Carlos Jobim included. Since then he played a lot of Brazilian music (also explored African and Latin music) and promoted the Trio da Paz (a trio of Brazilian musicians living in New York - guitarist Romero Lubambo, bassist Nilson Matta and drummer Duduka da Fonseca - they have several CDs released, the last one being on Malandro Records, a Cincinnatti label). Herbie returned in Brazil in 1998, after an absence of 36 years!!

Later

José

P.S. Next Thrusday is holiday in Brazil. It is possible it will be my day off instead of Friday. If so, don't be surprised if I do not send any email that day.


HI BJ,

Good news about João Donato - the Amazonas CD, his tour in the USA, including the Blue Note appearance, the future issue of his concert with the Sinfonica in São Paulo and their plans to record an album with Marcos Valle compositions. Too bad you can't attend Donato at the Blue Note in NY. I wish I could be up there that night. Such Donato exposure was long overdue and fortunately it is done these days. Better later than never.

My best,

José

 


HI BJ,

[. . .] Another great musician who moved to Brasília is guitarist Helio Delmiro, our # 1 guitar player and one of the best in the world. Last year Helio recorded a CD in duo with Clare Fischer, another advocate of bossa nova since the first hour.  Fischer recorded many albums with Bud Shank and Joe Pass in the early sixties for Pacific Jazz and he wrote "Pensativa", one of the loveliest songs ever written. Helio and Clare are schduled to play in one of our night clubs probably in August or September. Let's see.

José


HI again,

You're an itinerant encyclopedia! I'm really impressed with your knowledge about Mancini, his work, his wife, his children and everyhting concerned with him. Of course, I didn't knew anything about Ginny [Mancini].

Speaking about Tacoma, I took a look in the map and noticed its exact position in the USA. Of course, I knew that Washington State was on the West Coast. By the way, it seems that saxophonist Bud Shank lives near Seattle (I forgot the name of his city) and there he manages a jazz festival every year. I know that you know Shank - he recorded some beautiful Brazilian music with Laurindo Almeida and also with Donato in his "Bud Shank and His Brazilian Friends" (playing several Donato's compositions).

Did you noticed the wrong things João Gilberto did last week in the JVC Jazz Festival?  According [to] a friend, George Wein (JVC's director and producer) almost had a heart attack when Gilberto started to play at 10:55 and the concert would end at 11:00. I don't know more details but I suppose you got all information from newspapers, television and Internet. He always was a very difficult person to deal with, the champion of complication...

José


 

Hi BJ,

Yes, during my youth I studied clarinet and alto sax. I studied because I would like to know how the musicians played their instruments, how they could get a sound, the difficulties to master an instrument and things like that. I never thought to be a musician, I was interested to know something how to play and some other technical musical problems as the basis to be a better critic, nothing else. After having played some jam sessions with friends I gave up my instruments and sold them. It was just that.

José


 

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